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The Myth

Finding a lump in your breast means you have breast cancer.

The Truth

If you discover a persistent lump in your breast or any changes in breast tissue, it is very important that you see a physician immediately. However, 8 out of 10 breast lumps are benign, or not cancerous. Sometimes women stay away from medical care because they fear what they might find. Take charge of your health by performing routine breast self-exams, establishing ongoing communication with your doctor, and scheduling regular mammograms.

 

The Myth

Men do not get breast cancer.

The Truth

Quite the contrary. Each year it is estimated that approximately 1,700 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 450 will die. While this percentage is still small, men should also give themselves regular breast self-exams and note any changes to their physicians.

 

The Myth

A mammogram can cause breast cancer to spread.

The Truth

A mammogram, or X-ray of the breast, is one of the best tools available for the early detection of breast cancer. It CANNOT cause cancer to spread, nor can the pressure put on the breast from the mammogram. Do not let tales of other people's experiences keep you from having a mammogram. Base your decision on your physician's recommendation and be sure to discuss any questions or concerns with your doctor.

 

The Myth

Having a family history of breast cancer means you will get it.

The Truth

While women who have a family history of breast cancer are in a higher risk group, most women who have breast cancer have no family history. If you have a mother, daughter, sister, or grandmother who had breast cancer, you should have a mammogram five years before the age of their diagnosis, or starting at age 35.

 

The Myth

Breast cancer is contagious.

The Truth

You cannot catch breast cancer or transfer it to someone else's body. Breast cancer is the result of uncontrolled cell growth in your own body.However, you can protect yourself by being aware of the risk factors and following an early detection plan.

 

The Myth

Knowing you have changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene can help you prevent breast cancer.

The Truth

While alterations in these genes in men and women can predispose an individual to an increased risk of breast cancer, only 5% to 10% of patients actually have this mutation. This is not an absolute correlation. Like your age or having a family history of breast cancer, it's a factor you just can't control. But you can let your physician know, perform regular breast self-exams, and focus on the fact your chances of not having this disease are greater than 90%.

 

The Myth

Antiperspirants and deodorants cause breast cancer.

The Truth

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are not aware of any conclusive evidence linking the use of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer.

 

Newsflash!

Bras for a Cause 2014

Bras for a Cause October 2, 2014 at River Ranch in the Stockyards

 ***FUN TO BE HAD BY ALL (over 21)! NOT JUST FOR WOMEN! MEN~COME OUT AND SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR THE FIGHT AGAINST BREAST CANCER!***

The event will be at River Ranch on Oct. 2, 2014. The decorated bras will be premiered in a runway show, modeled by local Firefighters and auctioned off to raise money. In addition, there will be music, food, entertainment, and silent auction.

 
 
 
 
 

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Breast Cancer Statistics

  • About 1 in 8 U.S. women (just under 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.
  • In 2011, an estimated 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 57,650 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
  • About 2,140 new cases of invasive breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in men in 2011. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.